Watch and Learn

“Why do you like this show? It’s sort of weird.”

“I just do, Mom.”

“But why? Why do you pick it?”

“I don’t know. I like the action.  But I also like shows where someone doesn’t change themselves to make people like them.”

I was surprised. I honestly didn’t think he would have such an insightful answer, but it makes sense. His favorite shows are Pokemon, Digimon, and Yu-Gi-Oh. While I think they are pretty strange and the characters act odd, he loves it. I’ve watched with him before and he’s right: the main characters in the shows are all people who are loyal, trustworthy, and kind. And even though they are regularly taunted, they choose to stay true to themselves and their friends.

Everyone knows one of the reasons I am such a big advocate for reading is to build empathy and compassion in my kids’ hearts. It never occurred to me until Eddie said this that media like TV, movies, and games could help instill this as well. We blame TV and movies for a lot of ills–and rightly so. There is a lot of garbage out there that can undo the values we try to instill in our kids. But there are good shows out there too that reinforce the kind of people we want our kids to grow up to be. And let’s be honest: sometimes our kids will listen to what a cool show or movie says more than they will listen to their parent, am I right?

Monday Eddie discovered Happy Feet (which was just released May 1 on Netflix). He was engrossed because he loves music and funny penguins, but I realized that this too was another show where the main character embraces who he is–a penguin that can’t sing, but has mad dance skills.

Another character Eddie identifies with is King Julian. Again, I think it’s maybe the made dance moves and the fact that he, too, likes to “move it, move it.” Eddie is a goofy, positive, happy kid who wants to spread that around to others. He is unapologetic for being who he is. A new series, “All Hail King Julian: Exiled” is coming to Netflix May 12. Ed’s pumped.

We have our share of struggles with Eddie as he approaches age 8, but self-confidence about who he is has never been one of them. In fact, I admire his ability to walk into a room and make friends immediately with anyone. I think it’s no coincidence that he choose shows and movies with protagonists who have the same qualities.

Oh! Before I sign off…The Secret Life of Pets is now on Netflix! I’ll admit, I have NO IDEA if this fits what I’m writing about here, but I can tell you it is on deck for a Sluiter Family Movie Night soon!

Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post. I am a member of the Netflix Stream Team. Netflix provides the Netflix and a device to watch it on, and my family and I provide the opinions. It’s good times for everyone!

 

 

falling down

As  little kid, my dad was the one who taught me how to do a lot of things:  ride my bike, change a car tire, fish.

He also taught me to ice skate.

I remember being out on our frozen pond, bundled up in my winter coat and snow pants with my scarf covering my entire mouth so that when I talked…or breathed…it became moist and warm.

My dad had helped me lace up my mom’s old skates, took my mittened hand, and pulled me out to the open ice.

I don’t remember much of the logistics of the lesson, but I do remember falling down.

A lot.

Finally I got frustrated and whined that I was no good at skating and I didn’t want to do it anymore.

My dad pulled me up and said, “but every time you fall, you are learning. just think of how much more you know now than you did when we started.”

I gave him the hairy eyeball, assuming he meant I knew a lot more now because I had fallen so many zillions of times.

“No, really,” he continued. “Every time you fall, you learn what not to do next time.  Or at least you should.”

This lesson comes back to me every single time I “fall” in life.

Continue Reading this post over at Lessons from Teachers and Twits where Renee was gracious enough to have me today.  So come on over.

comments are off here.  Go visit me there!

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